artmastered:

J. M. W. Turner, Snow Storm: Steamboat off a Harbour’s Mouth, exhibited 1842, oil on canvas, 91.4 x 121.9 cm, Tate Collection. Source
The story goes that Turner painted this particular stormy seascape whilst physically tied to the mast of a second ship. This is pretty unlikely, not to mention ridiculous, but the fact that the artist was able to recreate a scene as dramatic and terrifying as this is still a remarkable feat, and reminds the viewer of Turner’s natural talent.

artmastered:

J. M. W. Turner, Snow Storm: Steamboat off a Harbour’s Mouth, exhibited 1842, oil on canvas, 91.4 x 121.9 cm, Tate Collection. Source

The story goes that Turner painted this particular stormy seascape whilst physically tied to the mast of a second ship. This is pretty unlikely, not to mention ridiculous, but the fact that the artist was able to recreate a scene as dramatic and terrifying as this is still a remarkable feat, and reminds the viewer of Turner’s natural talent.

(via wowgreat)

archsy:

'Drawn' Meditations

The “design development” stage of the thesis unpacks the conventions of the architectural drawing to reveal territories and motives traditionally left behind as architects work through the design process. The mixed media composite 32” x 96” ink on Mylar drawing buildings from the schematics laid out from Generative Marks. Here, drawing is used as a tool and form of launching pad which begins to push ideas from the previous phase into a more specific architectural strategy for the development of a residence for one inhabitant. It curates space in a way that is similar to making marks on a surface and investigates the capacity for drawing to exceed a static mode— to open up the translational role of discovery and disclose aspects of a design that are not immediately apparent. A plan view, for example, presents an image of a setting or building that no one ever sees once the construction is completed. It is not just because it is taken from an impossible vantage point, but because it involves a manner of visualizing that makes visible different places at once, a simultaneity or immediacy that ordinary viewing never accomplishes. A section works in a similar manner, like an x-ray implemented through vision that is not achievable by common abilities of the human eye. If architectural drawings are meant to represent space at all, they represent the elements that structure the relationship that may come into existence. The use of a large drawing surface allows these meta-ideas to rub up against one another so the architect is able to come up with design solutions in a meditative fashion.

By: Jared Lanctot

(via visicert)

archatlas:

Design, 3D & Animation Thiago Lima

(via physical-dreamscape)

1825d:

Midterm Diagrams

(via grmhrtdesigns)

therhumboogie:

By Olafur Eliasson, this breathtaking installation at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art of a river running through the museum is astounding. It is such a realistic, natural landscape the museum could have been dropped on top of the river itself for how pristine it looks. This site-specific installation is a focus on experience, and how the viewer senses their surroundings. 

(Source: designboom.com, via physical-dreamscape)

superarchitects:

NON_SEQUITUR: A Neighbourhood

Anthony Morey / B.Arch / Southern California Institute of Architecture / Los Angeles, US / Advisors: Dwayne Oyler, Thom Mayne / August 2014

The Surrealist, early in the 1900’s, found themselves ready to clear the table, finding artist leisure in the process. They wanted nothing more than to create, flourish, but they understood that the tools at hand were not ready, not open to such a process, such an idea. They were limited by the current. They saw, that for the moment, the goal should not be to build, but to destroy, in order to one day rebuild. They needed to show the weakness, the choices, the ideas that were being lost, hidden in the shadows. Of course the political connections are more than plentiful, but their approach, their willingness to question, their mastery of the craft in order to know how to/ and where to experiment is the true power of the surrealist thought.

Series of Plans and Sections // Series one takes on the qualities of Plan and Section. There is an immediate knowable quality to the drawings, grasp-ability. Focusing on the tools that allow for such constant common readings to occur. Classic tools were at use, poshe, gestalt, hard lines, flattening of shapes, interior, elevation, proximity, movement. Allowing for the signifiers of plan and section to be called into question, allowing these to themselves allow for new associations, ones only possible when teased in the mind. There is no stair, elevator, steel column detail, and there shouldn’t be. Calling attention to moments, implying movement, not direction. Showing volume, but no scale. All these were understood to their fundamentals and then turned to cast doubt on themselves. Allowing for choice in the reading, unraveling.

(Source: super-architects.com, via archisketchbook)

thisbigcity:

That’s a lot of grass. Just imagine what could be done with all that space!
Have your own #citydata you’d like to share with the world?  Send it our way! 

thisbigcity:

That’s a lot of grass. Just imagine what could be done with all that space!

Have your own #citydata you’d like to share with the world?  Send it our way

(via urbnist)

landscapelifescape:

Bologne, Italy

by INVIV0

(Source: deviantart.com)

the-gasoline-station:

Istanbul - April 2014

by Sam Horine

(via alwaysinstudio)

throughjo:

backyard concrete and corten paradise…

hilgard garden terrrace by barensfeld architecure [(www.designboom.com)]

(via mimilin)