youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 
Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.
Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.

youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 

Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.

Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.

(via physical-dreamscape)

Miles Davis – Smoke gets in your eyes (3,663 plays)

Miles Davis
Smoke gets in your eyes

(Source: jazz-swing, via mimilin)

anniekoh:

asylum-art:

Sungseok Ahn’s series entitled “Historic Present”

South Korean artist Sungseok Ahn’s series entitled “Historic Present” questions the memory of past from the fast changing scenery of today. By overlapping a historical location with an old image of that exact place, he questions the way we treat our history and explores the dynamics between space and time at the same time.

This photo-in-photo juxtaposition has become popular. I like how he has used the screen as a physical insertion into the landscape, as a visual reminder of the distinction between the two kinds of images. 

remash:

jardins de métis | rotunda ~ citylaboratory

(Source: landezine.com, via danielkbrown)

probingtheearth:

Dan Kiley

probingtheearth:

Dan Kiley

(via carex)

thecreativesense:

Microgrowing Kit - InFarm

Another brilliant solution for urban farming, the Microgrowing Kit from InFarm is an origami-inspired form made from a transparent waterproof material and helps grow microgreens in any environment. Ten to fourteen days after planting the seeds within the kit, the greens are ready to eat without the need to water even once… and you can watch the growing process from start to finish. The best part? You can use the kit again and again as often as you like. 

See more at: InFarm

(via arciphilia)

archimess:

peter zumthor

hortus conclusus

(Source: arkiiv, via afotw)

afotw:

Yves Brunier. Museumpark Rotterdam. Three men and a dog walking (1989-1993) in COMPOSITE LANDSCAPES

afotw:

Yves Brunier. Museumpark Rotterdam. Three men and a dog walking (1989-1993) in COMPOSITE LANDSCAPES

afotw:

garden designed by Nelson Byrd Woltz

afotw:

garden designed by Nelson Byrd Woltz

yrdeadbeatfriend:

sixpenceee:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake 

coolest but scariest fucking thing

yrdeadbeatfriend:

sixpenceee:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake 

coolest but scariest fucking thing

(Source: sixpenceee, via plotscape)